Great Backyard Bird Count

All posts tagged Great Backyard Bird Count

By Matt Bailey, Delaware Nature Society Volunteer:

It is the depths of winter.  What better time to wrap your hands around a warm mug of your favorite comfort drink?  If you live in the US, that hot drink is statistically most likely to be coffee.  The warmth (and steam) wafting from your mug might put you in the mind of mid-Atlantic Spring and Summer and the wealth of songbirds they will bring.

Right now, Neotropical (western hemisphere) migrant birds like orioles, warblers, and hummingbirds are making their livings in Central and South America.  Many Paleotropical (eastern hemisphere) migrants are also awaiting the call to head north from their wintering grounds (pun intended).  Ecuador, Guatemala, Sumatra, Ethiopia are all on the list of important wintering locations as well as famed regions for coffee farming.  In Central and South America, most Neotropical migrants depend on tropical forest to successfully over-winter and survive to head north and breed.  Significant portions of Central and South America have been cleared of forest to make way for coffee monocultures.

This is a shade-grown coffee plantation that was visited on a DNS trip to Costa Rica in 2011. In order for the habitat to be functional for a diversity of songbirds, the overstory trees need to be diverse and native. Some shade-grown canopies consist of Eucalyptus trees, which aren’t native and don’t support a diversity of insects or bird-life.  Photo by Joe Sebastiani

We can speak up for these overwintering songbirds with our dollars in the marketplace and in the coffeeshops.  The most typical method for growing coffee involves taking a large parcel of land in the right habitat and shearing off the canopy trees to make room for coffee shrubs.  This eliminates key habitat for overwintering songbirds.

American Redstart is a Neotropical migrant that will utilize shade-grown coffee plantations in Central America. Photo by Joe Sebastiani

Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be this way.  There is a coffee growing method called shade-grown, or bird-friendly agriculture.  In this type of farming, coffee varieties can be chosen and growing regimes can be adjusted that allow the majority of the growing areas to remain forested.

The resulting crop yields award-winning coffee that lacks the bitter taste of unnecessary loss of habitat.  A win\win that affords us the chance to steep peacefully in the aroma of a sustainable harvest.

The Smithsonian Institute has the gold standard for certifying coffee plantations as being bird-friendly.  Just look for the logo below on the package to be sure you are purchasing the correct beans.  In addition to retaining canopy, Bird-friendly certification standards consider a variety of factors including promoting insect biodiversity and forgoing the use of pesticides.  The American Birding Association, whose national headquarters is in Delaware City, sells numerous varieties of Bird-Friendly coffee on their website and at the headquarters.

Shade-grown/bird-friendly coffee can be found at several local grocers and the local roaster Golden Valley Farms in West Chester.  Just make sure that the coffee you buy has the Smithsonian Bird Friendly certification on it.  Also, if you stop into your favorite coffee shop, be sure to ask if they have any shade-grown brews available.  If enough customers ask, an affirmative answer will likely eventually follow.  Put your dollar votes to work for conservation!

Speaking of birding, this Friday through Monday, February 15-18, 2019, Delaware Nature Society is participating in the Great Backyard Bird Count. This is an international effort to capture a snapshot of birds that are being seen around the world, organized by the National Audubon Society. If you participate, Birds & Beans Coffee company is offering a $5 coupon if you order Bird Friendly coffee on their website.  Just use the promo code GBBC$5OFF for your on-line order, which is good through the end of February.  You can participate at home on your own (see previous link) with a nice cup of Shade-grown coffee, or join us for some guided birding opportunities:

“Pop-Up Birders” will be coming to where you live, work, and play on February 15 at the following locations:

  • Newark Reservoir Parking Lot, Old Paper Mill Rd., Newark – 9am – Judy Montgomery
  • Brandywine Town Center Movie Theater – 10am – Joe Sebastiani
  • Tri-state Bird Rescue, Possum Hollow Rd., Newark – 11am – Judy Montgomery
  • BlackRock Incorporated, 100 Bellevue Parkway, Wilm. – noon – Joe Sebastiani and Kathie O’Neil
  • Dupont Environmental Education Center, Wilm. Riverfront – 1pm – Ian Stewart
  • Paper Mill Park, Polly Drummond Hill Road, Newark – 2pm – Judy Montgomery
  • Valley Garden Park, Rt. 82, Greenville – 3pm – Jim White

By attending one of these walks, receive a voucher for a free sample bag of bird seed at the Wild Birds Unlimited store in Hockessin.

We will also host a Breakfast and Bird Count program on Friday, February 15 with Ornithologist Ian Stewart at Coverdale Farm Preserve.  $15 ($10 for DNS members) includes the hearty breakfast and a guided bird walk in our beautiful preserve near Greenville.

Want a bit more adventure? Join us for Kent County Birding Day, Saturday, February 16. Meet at either Abbott’s Mill Nature Center or Ashland Nature Center and travel by van to Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge and other locations to look for waterfowl, eagles, and many more wintering species.  $30 ($20 for DNS members) includes van transportation as well as the guided birding tour.

For more information, please call (302) 239-2334 or visit www.delnature.org.

By Joe Sebastiani, Ashland Nature Center Manager

Now that the Philadelphia Eagles have won the Super Bowl, local fans now have to find something else to do for the remainder of winter.  How about participating in the Great Backyard Bird Count!  Ashland and Abbott’s Mill Nature Centers will join birders from all over the world for this year’s Great Backyard Bird Count!  We invite you to join us on our field trip to find birds in Kent County, Delaware on Saturday, February 17, 8am to 4pm.  Meet at either Abbott’s Mill Nature Center in Milford or Ashland Nature Center in Hockessin.  We will meet up and all go birding for the day together.  Call (302) 239-2334 if you would like to register.  $20 for DNS members and $30 for non-members.

Can’t get enough Eagles?? Join Matt Babbitt and Joe Sebastiani on Saturday, February 17, 8am-4pm for a Great Backyard Bird Count field trip where we are certain to see many Bald Eagles, waterfowl, wintering songbirds, and possibly some owls or other surprises. Call 302-239-2334 to register. $20/$30 DNS member/Non-member. Bald Eagle photo taken at the Bucktoe Creek Preserve, Avondale, PA by Joe Sebastiani

The GBBC is a worldwide citizen science effort to take a snapshot of bird distribution between February 16 and 19.  You can participate by looking for birds in your yard, or wherever you want to go including parks, wildlife refuges, the beach, etc.  Bird for at least 15 minutes, and enter your sightings.  Follow the link for the count above for directions on how to submit your findings.  Participate on your own anywhere you want to look for birds, or join our Delaware Nature Society trip to Kent County!

It was rather cold a few years back on the Great Backyard Bird Count, but it is always fun! Taken at Fort Dupont State Park by Joe Sebastiani.

Now, let me share a few statistics from the GBBC in 2017.  Worldwide, 6,285 species were found, which means well over half the 10,000 bird species on earth were seen within a 4-day period last February!  That is completely amazing to me.  Columbia took first place, where 1,042 species of birds were tallied.  This makes sense, since Columbia has the highest biodiversity of birds for any country.  The United States came in 7th place with 669 species.  In Delaware, observers found 147 species, and we placed 26th out of the 50 states.  Not too bad considering Delaware is a small state. 952 bird checklists were submitted here during the 4-day period, which is a lot of birding for our 3-county state over 4 days.  Click here to see the overall species list for last year’s GBBC in Delaware.  We’ll see how many species Delaware birders come up with this year, but my guess is that 147 species will be tough to beat.  Will we submit over 1,000 checklists?  It might be a nice target to surpass.

Watch your bird feeders and submit your sightings to the Great Backyard Bird Count, taking place February 16-19 this year. Red-bellied Woodpecker, Avondale, PA taken by Joe Sebastiani.

February is my least favorite month around here.  Football is over.  It is cold.  Nature is in a steady-state of ice, with wildlife waiting until the weather breaks. The first pitch of the baseball season is still a ways off.  For some outdoor fun, get out for the Great Backyard Bird Count and breathe some fresh air while you add to our knowledge of bird distribution.  Better yet, join me and Matt on the 17th.  Have fun!

Story and Photos by Joe Sebastiani, Seasonal Programs Team Leader

February can be boring as an outdoor enthusiast.  This year, it is especially true, with winter tightly gripping our region, and at least once a week we get slapped with another winter storm.  After a while, I start to lose enthusiasm for hiking on ice-crusted snow with face-numbing wind chills and frozen fingers and toes.  I can give you something to look forward to this week, however….the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC).  Starting this Friday, February 14th, and running through Monday, February 17th, the Great Backyard Bird Count wants your bird observations.

Search for wintering ducks like the fish-eating Common Merganser during the GBBC this weekend.  Look for these birds on any body of open water, even small creeks like the Red Clay Creek.

Search for wintering ducks like the fish-eating Common Merganser during the GBBC this weekend. Look for these birds on any body of open water, even small creeks like the Red Clay Creek.

The GBBC is run by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Audubon Society, and Bird Studies Canada.  The purpose of the count is to take a snapshot of bird populations around the world during mid-winter when birds are not migrating, during the leanest of times.  You can enter your sightings from anywhere during the 4-day period, whether it is your backyard, a park, wildlife refuge, the middle of a city, or while you are on vacation in Africa.  Anywhere in the world counts.

If you are birding in your yard during the GBBC, you probably will have lots of White-throated Sparrows coming to the feeders.

If you are birding in your yard during the GBBC, you probably will have lots of White-throated Sparrows coming to the feeders.

Participating is fun!  At the minimum, take a look at the birds in your yard, local park, neighborhood, or wherever you are for 15 minutes, and report what you see to the Great Backyard Bird Count website or eBird.  Either way, the data is going to the same place.  Each year, the data is used to track trends in bird populations on a global scale and is one of the biggest citizen science efforts anywhere where YOU provide the data.

Join the Delaware Nature Society on one of our field trips, this Friday February 14 through Monday February 17.  We will search the state of Delaware for as many species as we can find for the GBBC.

Join the Delaware Nature Society on one of our field trips, this Friday February 14 through Monday February 17. We will search the state of Delaware for as many species as we can find for the GBBC.

The GBBC has been running since 1998 and is always held in February for 4 consecutive days.  Last year in Delaware, 134 species were found during the Count.  The year with the highest species count was 2009, with 147 species tallied.  I would like to challenge you to get out at least once this coming Monday through Friday to get out somewhere, or at least look at your feeders from the warmth of your home, identify the birds you see, and report them to the GBBC.  I think we can beat 147 species in Delaware and make a real contribution to science together, resulting in a better understanding of the winter patterns of birds around us, benefiting their conservation.

Beautiful species such as this Swamp Sparrow await your discovery during the GBBC.  Get outside, make some observations, and report them for science, and the conservation of birds.

Beautiful species such as this Swamp Sparrow await your discovery during the GBBC. Get outside, make some observations, and report them for science, and the conservation of birds.

If you would like to join the Delaware Nature Society on guided field trips during the GBBC, we have them every day this Friday through Monday.  Visit the Delaware Nature Society website or call (302) 239-2334 ext. 134 to register.

Friday, February 14:

Abbott’s Mill Nature Center, 8am – noon.  Enjoy a pancake breakfast and exploring around the center, Blair’s Pond, and the Issacs-Greene Preserve.  Leader: Jason Beale.  Member/Non-member: $7/$10

Coverdale Farm Preserve, 8am – 11am.  Enjoy a big, hot breakfast and a walk around Coverdale Farm Preserve.  Leaders: Sheila Vincent, Joe Sebastiani, Derek Stoner, and Jim White.  Member/Non-member: $15/$22.

Saturday, February 15:

Sussex County Tour.  Meet at Ashland Nature Center (7am) or Abbott’s Mill Nature Center (8:30am) and travel by van to birding hotspots in Sussex County.  We will look for Snowy Owls, and visit places such as Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Cape Henlopen State Park, and Indian River Inlet in search of sea ducks, marsh birds, gulls, and other winter specialties.  Leaders: Jason Beale and Joe Sebastiani.  If you meet at Ashland – Member/Non-member: $25/$35.  If you meet at Abbott’s – Member/Non-member: $15/$25.

Sunday, February 16:

Kent County Tour.  Meet at Ashland Nature Center at 8am and travel by van to bayshore locations including Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Little Creek and Ted Harvey Wildlife Areas.  Leader: Bill Stewart.  Member/Non-member: $20/$30.

Monday, February 17:

New Castle County Tour.  Meet at Ashland Nature Center and travel by van to visit areas along the Delaware River from Fox Point State Park to Delaware City to find raptors, rare gulls, ducks, and marsh birds.  Leader: Derek Stoner.  Member/Non-member: $15/$22.

By Joe Sebastiani, Seasonal Program Team Leader

Hank Davis is a professional photographer, board member for the Delaware Nature Society, and is now a winner of the Great Backyard Bird Count photography contest.  Each year, the Great Backyard Bird Count has an associated photography contest, soliciting photographs from birders that are participating in the count.  Five “overall best photograph” winners are chosen.  In 2013, Hank’s photo of two feeding American Flamingo, pictured below, was chosen for 5th place, out of 7,000 entries.  This is quite an accomplishment!  Congratulations Hank!!

Hank Davis' photo of American Flamingos from the DNS trip to Cuba, February, 2013 won 5th place in the Great Backyard Bird Count contest last year.  It was chosen among 7,000 images entered into the contest.

Hank Davis’ photo of American Flamingos from the Delaware Nature Society trip to Cuba, February, 2013 won 5th place in the Great Backyard Bird Count contest last year. It was chosen among 7,000 images entered into the contest.  American Flamingo is common in many coastal locations in Cuba.

You might say, why flamingos?  Why Cuba?  Last year, the Great Backyard Bird Count went global.  Essentially, during a four-day period each February, birders count birds anywhere on earth, not just the backyard, and submit their sightings to the count at http://www.birdsource.org/gbbc.  The count is run by the National Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in order to get a snapshot of bird populations around the globe in mid-winter.  This citizen science research is generating very important data that will answer questions about bird populations, movements, winter range, and will ultimately help to conserve birds and their habitats.  It just so happened, that during the count period last year, Hank was on the Delaware Nature Society bird survey trip that I was leading to Cuba.  We tried very hard to enter as many bird checklists from Cuba as we could, knowing that we might be the only birders representing the nation for the count.

Hank’s excellent flamingo photo is not his only entry that was recognized.  Below is a great photo of a Cuban Emerald that he captured, also on Cayo Coco, Cuba.  The Cuban Emerald photo was awarded an honorable mention in the “overall best photo” category.

Hank Davis takes some amazing photographs of birds.  This Cuban Emerald was taken on Cayo Coco, Cuba on the Delaware Nature Society trip to the island nation last February.

Hank Davis takes some amazing photographs of birds. This Cuban Emerald was taken on Cayo Coco, Cuba on the Delaware Nature Society trip to the island nation last February.  The Cuban Emerald is a large hummingbird that is very common across the island of Cuba.

If you want to participate in the Great Backyard Bird Count in 2014, just go birding anywhere you want and submit your sightings to the website I provided above.  The dates of the count are February 14-17 and you are encouraged to enter as many checklists as you want, whether they are from your backyard, a local park, or while you are visiting another country!  Take a look at the results from the 2013 count, where 4,004 species of birds were reported from around the world, and in Delaware, 144 were reported.