common elderberry

All posts tagged common elderberry

By John Harrod: Manager, Dupont Environmental Education Center

Blooming right now in the Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge is a great shrub of utility and beauty. The common elderberry (Sambucus Canadensis), also known as American elder, can be found throughout Delaware and along the Eastern U.S. from Canada to Florida. Elderberry is a pioneer species and sprouts rather quickly in areas of disturbance. Its haunts are wet areas including stream banks, ditches, moist meadows, marshes and swamps, which is why it can be found in our refuge.

Common Elderberry blooming along the boardwalk trail at the Dupont Environmental Education Center.  Photo by John Harrod

Common elderberry blooming along the boardwalk trail at the Dupont Environmental Education Center. Photo by John Harrod

This deciduous multi-stemmed shrub tends to have an arching habit and grows to 12 feet tall. Elderberry is quite vigorous and responds to pruning well, and will become quite dense through sucker growth making it a nice screen. Carpenter bees and mason bees tunnel into its soft pith of broken stems to construct nests for their young.

Common elderberry produces masses of white flowers in large umbels. The flowers are quite fragrant and attract many pollinating insects. The flowers are sometimes used to make elderflower water which is used in perfumes.

A close-up view of the Common Elderberry flower.  Photo by John Harrod.

A close-up view of the common elderberry flower. Photo by John Harrod.

After the blooms, elderberry produces fruits that are relished by at least 50 kinds of birds including American Robin, Cedar Waxwing, and Tufted Titmouse. People enjoy them too. Raw elderberries have an unpleasant taste and contain small amounts of poisonous alkaloids, so cooking is the way to go. The heat of cooking removes the toxins and improves the taste leading the way to delectables like jelly, preserves, pies, and wine.

The small fruits of the elderberry, which we will see later this summer, are eaten by a wide variety of birds.  Photo by H. Zell.

The small fruits of the elderberry, which we will see later this summer, are eaten by a wide variety of birds. Photo by H. Zell.

The refuge is open dawn to dusk daily, so come out and see the elderberry for yourself as well as the many other bloomers including the sweet scented Sweetbay Magnolia. While there, stop inside the DuPont environmental Education Center and ask a naturalist to lead you on a walk to find more plants.