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All posts by Shannon Giordano

Story and photography by Jim White, Senior Fellow for Land and Biodiversity

Although I have seen it many times, I still always pause at the sight of an American Kestrel. This smallest, and most colorful, of North American falcons is a master of flight. It can soar high — or hover dragonfly-like over open lands while searching for prey, suddenly plummeting downward, swooping onto some unsuspecting meadow vole or large insect.

As part of our ongoing cavity-nesting bird box program at the Coverdale Farm Preserve, seven American Kestrel nest boxes have been installed over the years and are maintained and monitored each nesting season. This year the Delaware Nature Society joined with a nationwide program that focuses on increasing the American Kestrel population throughout the United States. Surveys have indicated that the species has suffered dramatic declines throughout much of its range. The lack of adequate foraging habitat and nesting sites are possible reasons for this decline. As part of this nationwide program, Delaware Nature Society Land and Biodiversity Management staff have monitored the nest boxes weekly this year for adult activity.

Because the open meadows of the Coverdale Farm Preserve are excellent habitat for kestrels, we were confident that at least one pair would take up residence. We were not disappointed. On March 13th we observed a male perched on one of the boxes. Three days later a female appeared. Throughout the rest of March and into mid-April the pair was frequently seen hunting over the meadows of the preserve, catching meadow voles and jumping mice. Finally on April 23rd we discovered three eggs in the box. A few days later there were five eggs.

Then on March 31st we observed five, some may say “cute”, nestlings.

On June 14th, biologists from the Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife captured and placed identification bands on the nestlings, so that they could be identified if recaptured in the future. The team also took measurements to determine the age and health of the nestlings. We were glad to learn that all five nestlings looked healthy and had plenty of body fat. After “processing”, the nestlings were carefully placed back into their nest box, and the team left them to continue to grow and fledge (probably in a week or so).

So next time you visit the Coverdale Farm Preserve be sure to look up: you may just see one of these beautiful falcons!

P.S. Interestingly enough, on June 9th, staff discovered a second active nest with three eggs. We are hoping that this nest will also be successful.

By Sally O’Byrne, Trip Leader
Photos by Robert Tuttle, Jr.

A wastewater plant may not be the first place that comes to mind to look for birds, but many birders know the secret; They can prove to be quite good places to find gulls and waterfowl, often unusual in timing or species. Our local plant, operated by Veolia, is known as a great place for ducks which can be found in great numbers on the ‘polishing’ ponds adjoining the river.   Polishing ponds are the very last stage of a series of processes that separate solids from water and then cleans the water enough so it can be discharged to the Delaware River.

Aerial photo of Veolia Waste Water Plant

Aerial photo of Veolia Waste Water Plant

The wastewater that travels through sewers and enters the plant is called ‘influent’, and the first step is a mechanical bar screen that removes rags, paper, and other articles larger than a centimeter. Those screenings go to a landfill.   The ‘effluent’ (wastewater that exits) is then channeled into a grit chamber where the velocity is slowed down and the heavier grit, sand, and gravel settle out and are removed.

A large drum removes rags, paper, and other articles larger than a centimeter

A large drum removes rags, paper, and other articles larger than a centimeter

After leaving the grit chamber the wastewater enters a primary clarifier, where velocity slows again and additional suspended matter, typically organic, settles to the bottom forming a sludge layer. Greases and oil and other floating matter, rise to the top and form a scum layer.   Slow rotational scraper blades move the sludge to a hopper at the bottom of the clarifier and a skimmer on the surface directs the scum to another collector.

Empty and full clarifier

R to L: Empty and full clarifier

 

Now comes the secondary treatment; the wastewater flowing out of the primary clarifier goes into aeration basins where it is exposed to living organisms and bacteria that consume most of the organic matter in the wastewater. The water is bubbled to supply the microorganisms with the oxygen they need. In about 3 hours, the time it takes for the water to pass through the aeration tank, most of the organic matter has been consumed. (photo of aeration basin)

aeration basin

aeration basin

The secondary clarifiers receive the mixed liquor (wastewater and microorganisms) from the aeration tank. Here the scum on top is once again skimmed off and the activated bacteria that has settled to the botton is scraped into a hopper and then returned to the aeration chambers. The microrgasims will have increased through reproduction, so the excess are removed as sludge. The clear water leaving this basin now goes for Tertiary treatment. Here we have a group of Ring-billed Gulls enjoying the ‘fruits’ of Veolia’s efforts at the clarifier!

Ring-billed Gulls reaping the benefits of the clarification process

Ring-billed Gulls reaping the benefits of the clarification process

Throughout this phase, removed sludge is taken to an anaerobic chamber which gives off methane as it further digests the sludge. The methane is ‘flared’ and the final digested sludge is dewatered. It now looks and smells like humus and can be sold for non- edible application (e.g. golf courses).

A methane flair

A methane flair

Tertiary treatment happens in the large Polishing Ponds, the desired destination of avid winter birders. It takes about 3 days for the water to move through these ponds, where further settling and bacterial action take place. As a final treatment, the water is given a dose of bleach before it is sent into the Delaware River. The effluent entering the Delaware is tested daily for fecal coliform and other pollutants.   It is discharged through a pipe in the middle of the river at a depth of approximate 35 ft.

Waterfowl floating on the polishing ponds

This photo is from December 14, 2008, but shows the sorts of waterfowl number that are here in Winter.

We spent the final portion of our tour looking at a variety of ducks in the polishing ponds. In most places in New Castle County, the waterfowl have already migrated North, but here in this protected spot, we had a nice show.   On our trip, we had far fewer ducks than can be found in mid-Winter, but we had a nice variety; Gadwall, Mallard, Northern Shoveler, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, and Ruddy Duck . We counted 23 species of birds for the day at Veolia Waterwater Treatment Plant – not bad for a place where most folks just want to hold their nose.

A Lesser Scaup duck floating in the polishing pond

A Lesser Scaup duck floating in the polishing pond

By Carrie Scheick, Teen Naturalist Program Leader

The Teen Naturalists kicked off 2017 by orienteering at French Creek State Park in Berks County, PA. This 7,339 acre park was logged repeatedly to make charcoal for the Hopewell Furnace, which operated until the late 1800s. The land was sold to the government in the Great Depression, and managed similarly to the national parks at the time, with the Civilian Conservation Corps building recreational facilities in the park. Today the park land is owned by the State of Pennsylvania and the National Park Service maintains the historic furnace as the Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site. This park is the largest contiguous forest between New York City and Washington D.C., known for the variety of wildlife and recreational activities, including more than 35 miles of trails.

French Creek State Park is also home to a permanent orienteering course. Orienteering is a sport that combines navigational skills and racing. Participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to move from point to point, trying to complete the course in the least amount of time. We were not that competitive, but we did enjoy the challenge of navigating ourselves through the course around Hopewell Lake.

 

Orienteering orientation. Photo by Hannah Greenberg.

Orienteering orientation. Photo by Hannah Greenberg.

 

After a quick introduction, the Teens began to familiarize themselves with the compass, map, and map legend. Orienteering maps are incredibility detailed – roads, fences, trails, streams, hills, depressions, rocks, vegetation, etc. are accurately located. The Teens oriented themselves from our starting point in the parking lot to “control #1”. We set off in that direction, searching for a post with an orange and white square at the top.

 

he red lines and control numbers designate the orienteering course. Photo by Carrie Scheick

The red lines and control numbers designate the orienteering course. Photo by Carrie Scheick

 

Check out this super detailed legend! Photo by Carrie Scheick.

Check out this super detailed legend! Photo by Carrie Scheick.

 

Where are we? Where are we going next? Photo by Carrie Scheick.

Where are we? Where are we going next? Photo by Carrie Scheick.

Each post had the control number and letter code on the marker post placard. The letter code is recorded for competitive orienteering, to prove you made it to that location.

We recorded the letters in hopes that they spelled a word upon completion of the course, but they unfortunately did not. Photo by Carrie Scheick.

We recorded the letters in hopes that they spelled a word upon completion of the course, but they unfortunately did not. Photo by Carrie Scheick.

 

Our orienteering adventure took us on and off trail…

Photo by Carrie Scheick

Photo by Carrie Scheick

 

…over logs and through boulder fields…

Photo by Carrie Scheick

Photo by Carrie Scheick

 

…across crossable and un-crossable streams…

Photo by Hannah Greenberg

Photo by Hannah Greenberg

Photo by Carrie Scheick

Photo by Carrie Scheick

 

…up and down hills and to the very edge of the park.

Photo by Carrie Scheick

Photo by Carrie Scheick

Photo by Carrie Scheick

Photo by Carrie Scheick

 

There were times we needed to pause and look at the map…

Photo by Hannah Greenberg

Photo by Hannah Greenberg

 

…but we were always excited when we successfully made it to each marker.

Photo by Hannah Greenberg

Photo by Hannah Greenberg

 

The misty rain and fog provided us with beautiful scenery in the woods. We saw and/or heard multiple species of birds including Mallard, Pileated Woodpecker, Belted Kingfisher, Downy Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, Carolina Chickadee, White-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, and Eastern Bluebird. There was a variety of fungi including puffball fungus, polypore fungus, and witch’s butter fungus. A Northern Watersnake took advantage of the mild temperatures and came out to say hello to us at the dam.

 

Mallards on a foggy Hopewell Lake. Photo by Hannah Greenberg.

Mallards on a foggy Hopewell Lake. Photo by Hannah Greenberg.

Photo by Carrie Scheick

Photo by Carrie Scheick

Check out the bright orange color of Witch’s butter fungus. Photo by Hannah Greenberg.

Check out the bright orange color of witch’s butter fungus. Photo by Hannah Greenberg.

Northern water snake. Photo by Carrie Scheick.

Northern water snake. Photo by Carrie Scheick.

For most of the Teens, this was their first experience orienteering. They all enjoyed the challenge, as it gave additional purpose to their hike and time outdoors. This outing was a great way to kick off the year!

Photo by Carrie Scheick.

Photo by Carrie Scheick.

Photo by Hannah Greenberg.

Photo by Hannah Greenberg.

The Teen Naturalist program is open to teens ages 13-17 who have an interest in studying nature, adventuring outdoors, volunteering, and meeting other teens who enjoy these same activities. You can register at www.delnature.org/programs or contact us at (302) 239-2334 for more information and the program schedule.

By: Matt Babbitt, Abbott’s Mill Nature Center Manager

Thank you to everyone who joined Delaware Nature Society at both our inaugural Meal at the Mill, on Friday, October 14, and a special return of our Autumn at Abbott’s Festival, on Saturday, October 15, in final celebration of Abbott’s Mill Nature Center’s 35th Anniversary!

Guests at Meal at the Mill opened the event with a keg-conditioned cocktail from Dogfish Head Craft Brewery while mingling amongst hors d’oeuvres from Abbott’s Grill and touring Delaware’s only preserved, working gristmill. We then conjoined for a family-style, three-course seated dinner featuring seasonal vegetables and free-range chickens grown and raised on Delaware Nature Society’s own Coverdale Farm Preserve, with catering by Abbott’s Grill and menu pairings from Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. Dinner began with remarks by Brian Winslow, DNS Executive Director, Matt Babbitt, Abbott’s Mill Nature Center Manager, and Mark Carter, Dogfish’s Director of Philanthropy and DNS Board Member. Special guests of the evening included representatives of Delaware’s Division of Historical & Cultural Affairs (an owning partner of Abbott’s Mill), as well as Councilmembers from the Town of Slaughter Beach (which hosts DNS’s 109-acre Marvel Saltmarsh Preserve) and our hometown Milford City Manager. We amazingly sold out all seats for this event, and were very appreciative of the 93 guests who joined us under the stars to honor the history of Abbott’s Mill Nature Center and celebrate its bright future.

The next day, our Autumn at Abbott’s Festival brought out 350+ community members to enjoy the sunny skies at Abbott’s. This community-minded event highlighted the historic importance of Abbott’s to the lower, slower Southern Delaware culture, and provided several opportunities to explore the natural wonders preserved on our pet-friendly trails and 20-acre pristine pond. Last run in 2008, the event has historically featured a variety of artisan craft demonstrators, children’s activities, hay rides, and tours of our historic Abbott’s Mill. For the 35th we raised the stakes by adding in the Drift’n Kitchen and Heavenly Delights Concessions food trucks, a Dogfish Head Craft Brewery beer garden with lawn games, yoga sessions led by Lewes’ Free Spirited Foundation, aquatic touch tanks from Phillips Warf Environmental Center, guided SUP & kayak trips on Abbott’s Pond provided by Quest Fitness & Kayak, and live music from local musicians Margaret Egeln, the Clifford Keith Trio, and 3CNorth.

Both of these events would not have been possible without the support of all of our community sponsors as well as the 50+ volunteers and DNS staff who helped setup both events and took care of all of the behind the scenes work to make our event a success. Special thanks, as well, to our 35th Anniversary Presenting Sponsors: Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, National Wildlife Federation, and M&T Bank.

We would love to have all of you join us again as we continue celebrate Abbott’s Mill Nature Center’s 35th Anniversary throughout 2016. Please visit delnature.org/abbotts35 to explore the full celebration.

Additionally, as part the celebration, we are offering special pricing for Delaware Nature Society memberships at the individual adult and household/grandparent levels. Normally priced at $40 and $55 respectively, we are offering these memberships for $35 through the end of the year, and they can be purchased in person at the Abbott’s Visitor Center, or visit delnature.org/becomeamember to purchase online. A Delaware Nature Society membership includes the following benefits:

  • Membership valid for 12 months from purchase date
  • Free canoe rentals on Abbott’s Pond (*must call ahead to schedule)
  • Free admission to Autumn at Abbott’s Festival & Farm Fun Days at DNS’s Coverdale Farm
  • Free or reduced pricing on DNS programs
  • Priority buying window for DNS’s Native Plant Sale
  • Helping to preserve over 500 acres of wildlife habitat & hiking trails in Southern Delaware and over 2,000 state-wide
  • Discounts at local retail affiliates (including Quest Fitness & Kayaks and East Coast Garden Center)
  • Participation in the Association of Nature Center Administrators’ (ANCA) nation-wide reciprocal membership program

We are actively exploring the possibility of making these annual events at Abbott’s, and are thankful for the positive and constructive feedback we have received from everyone involved. Inaugural and/or returning events always present opportunities to learn and grow, and we will certainly incorporate your feedback when we begin to prep for next year. Thank you again for being a part of our year-long celebration of Abbott’s Mill Nature Center’s 35th Anniversary, and please continue to share your event pictures to our Facebook and Instagram pages, or through email at matt@delnature.org.