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All posts by Joe Sebastiani

By Matt Bailey, Delaware Nature Society Volunteer:

It is the depths of winter.  What better time to wrap your hands around a warm mug of your favorite comfort drink?  If you live in the US, that hot drink is statistically most likely to be coffee.  The warmth (and steam) wafting from your mug might put you in the mind of mid-Atlantic Spring and Summer and the wealth of songbirds they will bring.

Right now, Neotropical (western hemisphere) migrant birds like orioles, warblers, and hummingbirds are making their livings in Central and South America.  Many Paleotropical (eastern hemisphere) migrants are also awaiting the call to head north from their wintering grounds (pun intended).  Ecuador, Guatemala, Sumatra, Ethiopia are all on the list of important wintering locations as well as famed regions for coffee farming.  In Central and South America, most Neotropical migrants depend on tropical forest to successfully over-winter and survive to head north and breed.  Significant portions of Central and South America have been cleared of forest to make way for coffee monocultures.

This is a shade-grown coffee plantation that was visited on a DNS trip to Costa Rica in 2011. In order for the habitat to be functional for a diversity of songbirds, the overstory trees need to be diverse and native. Some shade-grown canopies consist of Eucalyptus trees, which aren’t native and don’t support a diversity of insects or bird-life.  Photo by Joe Sebastiani

We can speak up for these overwintering songbirds with our dollars in the marketplace and in the coffeeshops.  The most typical method for growing coffee involves taking a large parcel of land in the right habitat and shearing off the canopy trees to make room for coffee shrubs.  This eliminates key habitat for overwintering songbirds.

American Redstart is a Neotropical migrant that will utilize shade-grown coffee plantations in Central America. Photo by Joe Sebastiani

Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be this way.  There is a coffee growing method called shade-grown, or bird-friendly agriculture.  In this type of farming, coffee varieties can be chosen and growing regimes can be adjusted that allow the majority of the growing areas to remain forested.

The resulting crop yields award-winning coffee that lacks the bitter taste of unnecessary loss of habitat.  A win\win that affords us the chance to steep peacefully in the aroma of a sustainable harvest.

The Smithsonian Institute has the gold standard for certifying coffee plantations as being bird-friendly.  Just look for the logo below on the package to be sure you are purchasing the correct beans.  In addition to retaining canopy, Bird-friendly certification standards consider a variety of factors including promoting insect biodiversity and forgoing the use of pesticides.  The American Birding Association, whose national headquarters is in Delaware City, sells numerous varieties of Bird-Friendly coffee on their website and at the headquarters.

Shade-grown/bird-friendly coffee can be found at several local grocers and the local roaster Golden Valley Farms in West Chester.  Just make sure that the coffee you buy has the Smithsonian Bird Friendly certification on it.  Also, if you stop into your favorite coffee shop, be sure to ask if they have any shade-grown brews available.  If enough customers ask, an affirmative answer will likely eventually follow.  Put your dollar votes to work for conservation!

Speaking of birding, this Friday through Monday, February 15-18, 2019, Delaware Nature Society is participating in the Great Backyard Bird Count. This is an international effort to capture a snapshot of birds that are being seen around the world, organized by the National Audubon Society. If you participate, Birds & Beans Coffee company is offering a $5 coupon if you order Bird Friendly coffee on their website.  Just use the promo code GBBC$5OFF for your on-line order, which is good through the end of February.  You can participate at home on your own (see previous link) with a nice cup of Shade-grown coffee, or join us for some guided birding opportunities:

“Pop-Up Birders” will be coming to where you live, work, and play on February 15 at the following locations:

  • Newark Reservoir Parking Lot, Old Paper Mill Rd., Newark – 9am – Judy Montgomery
  • Brandywine Town Center Movie Theater – 10am – Joe Sebastiani
  • Tri-state Bird Rescue, Possum Hollow Rd., Newark – 11am – Judy Montgomery
  • BlackRock Incorporated, 100 Bellevue Parkway, Wilm. – noon – Joe Sebastiani and Kathie O’Neil
  • Dupont Environmental Education Center, Wilm. Riverfront – 1pm – Ian Stewart
  • Paper Mill Park, Polly Drummond Hill Road, Newark – 2pm – Judy Montgomery
  • Valley Garden Park, Rt. 82, Greenville – 3pm – Jim White

By attending one of these walks, receive a voucher for a free sample bag of bird seed at the Wild Birds Unlimited store in Hockessin.

We will also host a Breakfast and Bird Count program on Friday, February 15 with Ornithologist Ian Stewart at Coverdale Farm Preserve.  $15 ($10 for DNS members) includes the hearty breakfast and a guided bird walk in our beautiful preserve near Greenville.

Want a bit more adventure? Join us for Kent County Birding Day, Saturday, February 16. Meet at either Abbott’s Mill Nature Center or Ashland Nature Center and travel by van to Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge and other locations to look for waterfowl, eagles, and many more wintering species.  $30 ($20 for DNS members) includes van transportation as well as the guided birding tour.

For more information, please call (302) 239-2334 or visit www.delnature.org.

By Joe Sebastiani, Ashland Nature Center Manager

Delaware Nature Society graduated fourteen “Certified Naturalists” in December, awarding those who successfully completed the year-long Naturalist Certification Series and the associated field journal.  In the past 12 years, over 300 people have taken this class which focuses on gaining a foundation for the study of nature in Delaware.

The Naturalist Certification class visits Teardrop Pond in Blackbird State forest with Jim White, Herpetologist and Delaware Nature Society Director of Land and Biodiversity.

Our graduates this year include: Jen Smyth, Suzanne Blair, Noreen Cambell, Brooke Cherry, Ted Gatanis, Lana Glass, Bea Kaplan, Laurie Linton, Emily Magnani, Christen Majewicz, Diane McGovern, Katie Pollock, Kayla Krenitsky, and Tere Schubert.  Delaware Nature Society congratulates them on their attendance and devotion to completing the field journal!

The first field trip of the year was to Coverdale Farm Preserve to study local mammals.  Register for the 2019 class, which begins on March 21st!  Photo by Noreen Campbell.

Students attend lectures and field trips revolving around 8 topics which include the study of: Mammals, Terrestrial Ecosystems, Reptiles and Amphibians, Birds, Wildflowers, Insects, Trees and Shrubs, and Aquatic Ecosystems.

The 2019 Naturalist Certification Series is ready for registration!  Here is a flyer to review about the class or send to your friends.  If you are a school teacher, by completing the class, you qualify for 60-hours of inservice credit.

A student in the Naturalist Series holds a Northern Pine Snake in the Herpetology lecture. Photo by Jim White

In one year, you will gain experience with tracking mammals, wade into a wetland at night in search of frogs, learn how to compare the ecology of different forests, evaluate stream ecological health, identify trees, shrubs, and wildflowers, understand various insect orders and their role in the environment, and band birds with an ornithologist.  In the process, you’ll make new friends who are interested in the outdoors, botany, wildlife, and the environment.  We hope you can join us for the 2019 Naturalist Certification Series.

In the meantime, here are some “Naturalist Quotes” for you to ponder and enjoy…

“We are all meant to be naturalists, each in his own degree, and it is inexcusable to live in a world so full of the marvels of plant and animal life and to care for none of these things.” ~ Charlotte Mason

“Since we humans have the better brain, isn’t it our responsibility to protect our fellow creatures from, oddly enough, ourselves?” ~ Joy Adamson

“Happy indeed is the naturalist: to him the seasons come round like old friends; to him the birds sing: as he walks along, the flowers stretch out from the hedges, or look up from the ground, and as each year fades away, he looks back on a fresh store of happy memories.” ~ John Lubbock

“Even the lifelong traveler knows but an infinitesimal portion of the Earth’s surface. Those who have written best about the land and its wild inhabitants…have often been stay-at-home naturalists…concentrating their attention and affection on a relatively small area.” ~ Edwin Way Teale

“The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness.” ~ John Muir

“Delight itself, however, is a weak term to express the feelings of a naturalist.” ~ Charles Darwin

By Jim White: Senior Fellow for Land and Biodiversity

It’s not every day that a new species of animal is found in Delaware. In fact, it is very rare indeed. However, in the summer or 2015 Adam Mitchel, a PhD candidate at the University of Delaware did just that. While collecting insects in a meadow at the Ashland Nature Center for his PhD research project on the effects of invasive alien plants on native insects, Adam found several insect specimens that he could not identify.  After examining them under a microscope in his lab he could only identify them as insects belonging to the Insect Order Thysanoptera commonly called Thrips (both the singular and plural of the noun has an (s). The Order Thysanoptera are minute insects with reduced wings, most species being around 1mm long. All but a few use sucking mouth parts to feed on the stems of plants. Several species are considered pest as they can damage crops and other plants. However, the vast majority of the 6,000 or so species are not pests to humans and are valuable members of the food chain.

This species of Thrips, new to science, was discovered at the Ashland Nature Center by entomologist Adam Mitchel. It has no English common name, but scientifically it is called Konothrips polychaeta.  Photo courtesy of Dr. Mitchel, from Goldarazena et al. (2017).

These tiny insects are not often studied unless they are considered pests and information on the many non-pest species is limited. Lucky for Adam, a professor from Belgium, Dr. Arturo Goldarazena…an authority on Thrips, was visiting the University of Delaware. Adam approached Dr. Goldarazena and asked if he would look at some of the Thrips specimens that he collected.  It did not take long for the professor to realize that he had never seen some of the specimens and declared that Adam might have discovered a new species. Adam agreed to give Dr. Goldarazena the specimens to study back in Belgium.  After an exhausting investigation the new species was described and published in Goldarazena et al. (2017). Its official scientific name is Konothrips polychaeta which loosely translates to “hairy tenacious woodworms”.  At this time, there is no common English name for this new species of Thrips. However, I propose to call it Mitchell’s Thrips.

Andropogon virginicus is the host plant for the newly discovered Thrips. Is the new species found wherever this plant exists??? Photo courtesy of Dr. Mitchel, from Goldarazena et al. (2017).

Finding a new species of animal or plant is a dream for biologists – finding them right under our noses in places like Ashland is even more exciting. Adam found the new species inside the flowers of the broom-sedge, Andropogon virginicus but he believes that Konothrips polychaeta probably feeds and breeds on other grasses and sedges that are abundant in the meadows and marshes at the Ashland Nature Center and beyond. These meadow and marsh habitats have been restored and maintained at several of Delaware Nature Society sites as part of the land and biodiversity management program. The program is dedicated to the conservation and preservation of native species and their habitats.

Dr. Adam Mitchel is a native Delawarean and discovered the new species of Thrips while he was a PhD candidate at the University of Delaware. Photo courtesy of Dr. Mitchel.

Dr. Adam Mitchel is a native Delawarean. He attended St. Marks High School and received his undergraduate degrees at the University of Delaware in Wildlife Conservation, Entomology, Plant Protection, Agriculture and Natural Resources (quad majored), and earned his master’s degree in Fish and Wildlife Management at Montana State University. Adam returned home to University of Delaware to obtain a PHD in Entomology and Wildlife Ecology (concentration: Entomology) at the time of the discovery of the Thrips. Adam is now employed as an Assistant Professor of Entomology at Tarleton State University in Texas.

Reference:

Goldarazena A, Mitchell AB and T. Hance (2017) Konothrips polychaeta sp.n. from Delaware, North America, with a key to the three species of this genus. Zootaxa 4341: 445-450.

Recently, Delaware Nature Society hosted an informational session with Dept. of Ag. Environmental Scientist Stephen Hauss at Ashland Nature Center. This came after the insect was documented at Ashland Nature Center by our Hawk Watch Coordinator. There have been other confirmed sightings of the insect in Northern Delaware as well. Delaware is the second state to report the Spotted Lanternfly, which was first found in Pennsylvania in 2014.

Pumpkin carved by Delaware Nature Society Web & Graphic Design Coordinator, Christi Leeson

What is the Spotted Lanternfly?

The Spotted Lanternfly is an invasive and destructive insect native to China, India, and Vietnam and is known to attack many hosts including grapes, apples, stone fruits, walnut, willow and tree of heaven. It is also known as the hitch-hiker bug as it has traveled far and wide “hitch-hiking” on vehicles and other outdoor items.

Why is this a bad bug?

Delaware’s #1 industry is agriculture. The Spotted Lanternfly is a potential threat to a wide variety of crops including grapes, peaches, apples, and timber.

What to look for

The adult Spotted Lanternfly is 1 inch long and a ½ inch wide when resting and has a wing span of about 2 inches. The forewings are grey with black spots, and the hind wings are red with black spots. The head and legs are black, and the abdomen is yellow with broad black bands. The immature stages of the Spotted Lanternfly are small, round, and black with white spots, and develop red patches as they grow.

Spotted Lanternfly Adult

Spotted Lanternfly Adult

 

Spotted Lanternfly Nymphs

Spotted Lanternfly Nymphs

The Spotted Lanternfly egg mass can be difficult to spot due to its color and being small. A fresh mass will have a grey putty-like covering on top of them, blending in to the bark of the tree it’s on. An older mass that has hatched will be brown and look dried and cracked.

Lanternfly egg mass on a rock

Lanternfly egg mass on a rock

It is believed that the Spotted Lanternfly needs to feed on Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) to reproduce but will feed on other hosts as well.

What to do

If you see a Spotted Lanternfly in any of its stages, it is important to report the sighting. The Delaware Department of Agriculture asks that anyone who sees a Spotted Lanternfly to follow the below steps:

  1. Take a picture: With the GPS function turned on your smartphone or a camera with GPS, take a photograph of any life stage (including egg masses). Upload your photograph to Facebook or Instagram, using the hashtag #HitchHikerBug. If you don’t have GPS capabilities and/or access to social media, submit the photograph via email to HitchHikerBug@state.de.us and include your name, contact information, and the address or georeference of where the photo was taken.
  2. Collect a specimen: Suspected specimens of any life stage can be collected and placed in a vial or plastic zip-lock bag with the name and contact information of the collector and turned into the Delaware Department of Agriculture CAPS program for verification. This insect is considered a threat to some crops and early detection is vital for the protection of Delaware businesses and agriculture.
  3. Report a site: If you can’t take a specimen or photograph, send an email to HitchHikerBug@state.de.ussubmit using this form or call (302) 698-4586 with a message detailing the location of the sighting and your contact information.

For more information, See the Department of Agriculture’s Spotted Lanternfly checklist.

Other things to know

The coloring of the Spotted Lanternfly indicates that it could be toxic to dogs and there have been reports of dogs becoming ill after eating them. Pet owners should be careful to keep animals from eating the insect in any stage of its life.

Spotted Lanternfly Fact Sheet