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All posts for the month April, 2017

By Sally O’Byrne, Trip Leader
Photos by Robert Tuttle, Jr.

A wastewater plant may not be the first place that comes to mind to look for birds, but many birders know the secret; They can prove to be quite good places to find gulls and waterfowl, often unusual in timing or species. Our local plant, operated by Veolia, is known as a great place for ducks which can be found in great numbers on the ‘polishing’ ponds adjoining the river.   Polishing ponds are the very last stage of a series of processes that separate solids from water and then cleans the water enough so it can be discharged to the Delaware River.

Aerial photo of Veolia Waste Water Plant

Aerial photo of Veolia Waste Water Plant

The wastewater that travels through sewers and enters the plant is called ‘influent’, and the first step is a mechanical bar screen that removes rags, paper, and other articles larger than a centimeter. Those screenings go to a landfill.   The ‘effluent’ (wastewater that exits) is then channeled into a grit chamber where the velocity is slowed down and the heavier grit, sand, and gravel settle out and are removed.

A large drum removes rags, paper, and other articles larger than a centimeter

A large drum removes rags, paper, and other articles larger than a centimeter

After leaving the grit chamber the wastewater enters a primary clarifier, where velocity slows again and additional suspended matter, typically organic, settles to the bottom forming a sludge layer. Greases and oil and other floating matter, rise to the top and form a scum layer.   Slow rotational scraper blades move the sludge to a hopper at the bottom of the clarifier and a skimmer on the surface directs the scum to another collector.

Empty and full clarifier

R to L: Empty and full clarifier

 

Now comes the secondary treatment; the wastewater flowing out of the primary clarifier goes into aeration basins where it is exposed to living organisms and bacteria that consume most of the organic matter in the wastewater. The water is bubbled to supply the microorganisms with the oxygen they need. In about 3 hours, the time it takes for the water to pass through the aeration tank, most of the organic matter has been consumed. (photo of aeration basin)

aeration basin

aeration basin

The secondary clarifiers receive the mixed liquor (wastewater and microorganisms) from the aeration tank. Here the scum on top is once again skimmed off and the activated bacteria that has settled to the botton is scraped into a hopper and then returned to the aeration chambers. The microrgasims will have increased through reproduction, so the excess are removed as sludge. The clear water leaving this basin now goes for Tertiary treatment. Here we have a group of Ring-billed Gulls enjoying the ‘fruits’ of Veolia’s efforts at the clarifier!

Ring-billed Gulls reaping the benefits of the clarification process

Ring-billed Gulls reaping the benefits of the clarification process

Throughout this phase, removed sludge is taken to an anaerobic chamber which gives off methane as it further digests the sludge. The methane is ‘flared’ and the final digested sludge is dewatered. It now looks and smells like humus and can be sold for non- edible application (e.g. golf courses).

A methane flair

A methane flair

Tertiary treatment happens in the large Polishing Ponds, the desired destination of avid winter birders. It takes about 3 days for the water to move through these ponds, where further settling and bacterial action take place. As a final treatment, the water is given a dose of bleach before it is sent into the Delaware River. The effluent entering the Delaware is tested daily for fecal coliform and other pollutants.   It is discharged through a pipe in the middle of the river at a depth of approximate 35 ft.

Waterfowl floating on the polishing ponds

This photo is from December 14, 2008, but shows the sorts of waterfowl number that are here in Winter.

We spent the final portion of our tour looking at a variety of ducks in the polishing ponds. In most places in New Castle County, the waterfowl have already migrated North, but here in this protected spot, we had a nice show.   On our trip, we had far fewer ducks than can be found in mid-Winter, but we had a nice variety; Gadwall, Mallard, Northern Shoveler, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, and Ruddy Duck . We counted 23 species of birds for the day at Veolia Waterwater Treatment Plant – not bad for a place where most folks just want to hold their nose.

A Lesser Scaup duck floating in the polishing pond

A Lesser Scaup duck floating in the polishing pond