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All posts for the month August, 2016

By Ian Stewart, Ornithologist

Orioles are a type of blackbird that are famous for having both beautiful plumage and a lovely musical song and we are fortunate indeed to have two of them breeding around our area.

Baltimore Orioles build distinctive hanging basket nests along the edges of forests and usually remain quite high in the trees where they feed on berries, nectar and insects, especially tent caterpillars. However, while bird-banding in May we were pleasantly surprised to find a male in one of our mist-nets!

Male Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole

The male Baltimore Oriole is a stunning bird with a jet black head and wings that seem to enhance the brightness of its orange body and shoulders. It was so named because these colors were similar to the coat of arms of Lord Baltimore, the first Governor of Maryland. When seen up close the breast feathers are particularly deeply colored.

Deep orange breast of the male Baltimore Oriole

Deep orange breast of the male Baltimore Oriole

The Orchard Oriole is quite a lot smaller than the Baltimore (only 20 grams vs 35 grams) and is more common in open areas with low trees and bushes where it feeds on insects and an increasing amount of fruit later in the summer. We caught and banded several of them recently in the meadow at Bucktoe Creek Preserve where they were probably feeding on blackberries. Older male Orchard Orioles have a black head and wings but their body and shoulders are a rich chestnut.

Male Orchard Oriole

Male Orchard Oriole

Interestingly, first-year male Orchard Orioles closely resemble the greenish-yellow females but have a distinctive black patch on their throat.

1st Year Male Orchard Oriole

1st year Male Orchard Oriole (if you look carefully you can see a few chestnut feathers on the breast)

Another curious oriole feature is easiest to see up close – they both have a peculiar grayish-blue base to their lower beak.

Blue lower beak of male Orchard Oriole

Blue lower beak of male Orchard Oriole

Both orioles spend the winter in the tropics and Orchard Orioles are already leaving, with most being gone by mid-August, at which point Baltimore Orioles also start to slink quietly away. Try to get outside and see these flaming songsters before it’s too late!

Visit the Bird Banding Stations at Ashland Nature Center (Monday 8am-11am) and Bucktoe Creek Preserve (Wednesday 8am-11am) to join Ian Stewart as he bands, measures, and documents the birds at these locations.