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All posts for the month May, 2016

By Ian Stewart, Ornithologist

Bird banding is in full swing at both Ashland Nature Center and Bucktoe Creek Preserve and our mist-nets are becoming dominated by Gray Catbirds! Gray Catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis) are grouped with Northern Mockingbirds and Brown Thrashers as ‘mimic-thrushes’ as all three are slender thrush-like birds with long tails and loud, elaborate songs. Indeed, catbirds get their name because of the peculiar cat-like ‘miaow’ call they often give while hidden low in a bush! Catbirds are by far the most common of the three mimic-thrushes however, and can be so abundant that many birdwatchers don’t give them a second glance. This is a pity, because catbirds have several interesting features which are particularly obvious when you are holding them during the banding process.

The first of these is the conspicuous rictal bristles around the base of their bill. Several other groups of birds have rictal bristles (especially flycatchers) and although their exact purpose is unknown they are thought to either have a sensory function or to prevent captured insects from scratching a bird’s eyes while they are being held in their bill.

Four rictal bristles can be seen at the base of this Gray Catbird's bill.

Four rictal bristles can be seen at the base of this Gray Catbird’s bill.

The second distinctive Catbird character is their crimson ‘crissum’. This is the patch of feathers underneath their tail which isn’t always easy to see in the field as Catbirds tend to stay fairly low to the ground. The third interesting plumage character of Catbirds, which can also be seen in the picture below, are the fairly obvious growth bars in their outer tail feathers. Growth bars appear as alternating light and dark bands and each pair of bands represents one 24 hour period of feather growth.

Underside of a Gray Catbird showing the crimson crissum and growth bars in the outer tail feathers.

Underside of a Gray Catbird showing the crimson crissum and growth bars in the outer tail feathers.

Not surprisingly, Catbirds were by far the most frequently caught species during the pilot banding project we conducted last summer at Ashland and Bucktoe. In just 3 months we caught 152 catbirds, of which 87 were juveniles likely hatched locally. So far this year we have recaptured 3 of the catbirds we banded last year and hope to recapture even more as the season progresses. It’s truly amazing to think that these 3 birds spent their winter over a thousand miles away in the south-eastern US or the Caribbean and yet came back to the same few hundred acre spots in DE and PA the following year!

The number on this metal leg band showed that this Gray Catbird was banded the previous year.

The number on this metal leg band showed that this Gray Catbird was banded the previous year.

So be sure to take a longer look at a Gray Catbird next time you see one. They are more interesting than you might think!

Public bird banding sessions are held at Ashland Nature Center on Monday and Bucktoe Creek on Wednesday, both from 8am – 11am, though banding does not take place if it is raining or windy, out of concerns for the birds’ safety.

Note that there will be no banding this Monday (May 30th) due to the Memorial Day Holiday.