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All posts for the month September, 2015

Alice Mohrman, Education Coordinator, Abbott’s Mill Nature Center

Meet at the historic Abbott’s  Mill spillway to begin your stream adventure on the Boardwalk Trail!  As the September light filters through the canopy, it highlights the clear water of Johnson’s Branch which skims effortlessly around branches scattered across the sandy bottom.  A journey along the meandering boardwalk offers something for everyone.  The raised trail is accessible for strollers, wheel chairs and walkers with benches for quiet contemplation and observing natural marvels.

The crisp notes, Teakettle-Tea-kettle-Teakettle clearly resonate across the wooded undergrowth as two male Carolina Wrens establish their presence.  Nesting and feeding territories are actively defended year round by these wrens which use their scimitar-shaped bill to glean insects from crevices.

The Carolina Wren is easily attracted to your backyard using a suet feeder.  Photo by Joe Sebastiani

The Carolina Wren is easily attracted to your backyard using a suet feeder. Photo by Joe Sebastiani

Look streamside for brilliant orange-red seeds nestled inside fuchsia pods in the native perennial shrub American Strawberry Bush, also known as “Hearts-a bustin”.  Euonymus America  thrives in moist soil and partial shade,  has subtle green blooms in May and June and scarlet leaves in late Fall.

Heart's-a-Bursting is a type of native Euonymous that grows on the coastal plain of Delaware.  Photo by Alice Mohrman.

Heart’s-a-Bursting is a type of native Euonymous that grows on the coastal plain of Delaware. Photo by Alice Mohrman.

Closer to the ground,  spy the remains of Ariseama triphyllum or Jack-in-the –pulpit:   a heavy cluster of red berries bending on a steam.   This harbinger of spring in the Calla Family  is distinctive for the unusual hooded flower that  grows on a separate stalk from the leaves.  A native food source for birds and mammals, avoid touching  the red fruit, leaves and roots which are considered poisonous.

Do not eat the berries of this plant, or any other plant you aren't fully sure won't harm you.  Jack-in-the-pulpit is poisonous, and tasting the berry will give you a severe burning sensation.  Indians called the seed head "The Fireball" for good reason.  Photo by Alice Mohrman.

Do not eat the berries of this plant, or any other plant you aren’t fully sure won’t harm you. Jack-in-the-pulpit is poisonous, and tasting the berry will give you a severe burning sensation. Indians called the seed head “The Fireball” for good reason. Photo by Alice Mohrman.

Check out the shiny black-brown Whirligig Beetles (56 different species of the Family Gyrinidae) synchronizing their spinning on the water surface!  They trap a bubble of air under their front wings which serves as an oxygen tank when the beetle dives underwater.  According to  A Guide to Freshwater Invertebrates of North America, adult whirligig beetles “emit defensive secretions that repel predators”.  The author noted, after handling some species of beetles,  the secretions had a  “ripe apple” aroma.

Around the boardwalk bend, Common Spicebush, Lindera benzoin, is a slim deciduous native shrub dotted with numerous oval-shaped scarlet red berries, each individually attached to the twig by a stem.  In early spring, the scented yellow flowers appear before the leaves.  The berries are a valuable food source for wildlife, especially birds.  Spicebush is a host plant for the large greenish, “clown-eyed”, caterpillar of the Spicebush Swallowtail which feeds on the leaves at night.  Late season caterpillars will overwinter camouflaged in their brown, leaf-like, chrysalis.

Right now, spicebush berries are fully ripe, and many species of birds will stop to eat them.  American Robin, Gray Catbird, Veery, Wood Thrush, and Red-eyed Vireo gorge on them.  Photo by Alice Mohrman.

Right now, spicebush berries are fully ripe, and many species of birds will stop to eat them. American Robin, Gray Catbird, Veery, Wood Thrush, and Red-eyed Vireo gorge on them. Photo by Alice Mohrman.

The Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly lays its eggs on spicebush.  Their larva look like a small snake to scare prey away.  Photo by Joe Sebastiani.

The Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly lays its eggs on spicebush. Their larva look like a small snake to scare prey away. Photo by Joe Sebastiani.

Stop by Abbott’s Mill Nature Center for a walk through our beautiful woodlands and boardwalk trail right now.  It will give you a good chance to step away from the hustle and bustle of daily life, and the ability to take a peek into the beauty of the natural areas near Milford.

By Ian Stewart, Ornithologist

Some of the coolest birds we have been catching at the banding stations at Ashland Nature Center and Bucktoe Creek Preserve are the ‘tree-dwellers’: the woodpeckers and nuthatches. These birds aren’t always easy to see during the summertime as they spend most of their day deep in the forest, hugging trunks or branches. However, once you learn to recognize the high-pitched ‘peenk’ of the Downy Woodpecker and the nasal ‘honk-honk-honk’ of the White-breasted Nuthatch you soon realize that both of these birds are quite common year-round.

We have caught and banded 11 Downy Woodpeckers since June and they are a treat to handle. Their bill is thin but strong and they have distinctive tufts of stiff bristles over their nostrils which probably stop chips of wood flying up their nose when they are hammering on trees!

Like several woodpeckers, you can tell what sex adult Downies are by checking out how many red feathers they have on their head – males have a red square at the back of their head but females do not. In most birds you cannot tell what sex juvenile birds are but in Downy Woodpeckers you can – the males have a spotted red cap but the females have a spotted white cap. Try to see if you can spot this next time you are out birdwatching!

Woodpecker collage

In this collage, the Downy Woodpecker in the main image is an adult male. In the lower left corner is a juvenile male, low center is an adult female, and the lower right is a juvenile female.

One morning at Ashland a group of lucky visitors were present when a Downy Woodpecker was captured in the same net as a Hairy Woodpecker! The Hairy Woodpecker is a larger version of the Downy but is much less commonly seen or heard, and the two can easily be confused as they look very similar. If you happen to be holding them both however, the difference is obvious – the Hairy is a bulky, powerful bird that is over twice the size of the dainty Downy.

A Hairy Woodpecker is above, and a Downy Woodpecker is below. Notice the beak of the Hairy...it is about as long as the head is wide. On the Downy, the beak is shorter than the head is wide.

A Hairy Woodpecker is above, and a Downy Woodpecker is below. Notice the beak of the Hairy…it is about as long as the head is wide. On the Downy, the beak is shorter than the head is wide.

We have caught 7 White-breasted Nuthatches so far and one of the first things you notice about them is their long thin, uptilted bill, which they use to pry up pieces of bark to get at the juicy insects beneath. Nuthatches can also be sexed according to their crown color, with males having a black crown and females having a paler, gray crown.

A male White-breasted Nuthatch. The black crown and uptilted bill is easy to see.

A male White-breasted Nuthatch. The black crown and uptilted bill is easy to see.

Even though nuthatches are striking birds at any distance they are even more stunning up close, with a sublime mix of black, white and blue-gray feathers and a distinctive patch of pale brown feathers underneath their tail. Interestingly, even though nuthatches spend a lot of their time climbing up tree trunks in the same way as woodpeckers, their toes are arranged like those of most birds, with three toes forward and one back (although the back toe has a long claw, as seen in the photo below). Unlike woodpeckers however, nuthatches will also climb down trunks and branches, and maybe they need three forward-pointing toes to brace themselves on these downward trips?

Note the underside of the White-breasted Nuthatch, and the very long claw on the hind toe.

Note the underside of the White-breasted Nuthatch, and the very long claw on the hind toe.

If you want to see either of these amazing birds, please visit one of our banding stations and you may get lucky. Alternatively, both of them can easily be attracted to bird feeders filled with black oil sunflower seed, especially during the wintertime.

Ian Stewart will be conducting a Bird Banding Demonstration on Saturday, October 10 as part of our programming at the Big Sit.  The Big Sit is an international competition to find as many species of birds from one location, a 17-foot-diameter circle, during the day this Saturday.  The Big Sit will be held at the Ashland Nature Center Hawk Watch, and we will also be offering nature walks at 10am and 2pm, a 1pm lecture on the Raptors of Fall Migration, and food to keep you going!