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All posts for the month March, 2015

By Dan O’Brien, Community Supported Agriculture Farmer:

Spring is officially here in Delaware! At Coverdale Farm Preserve on the first day of spring we welcomed five new porcine pals to our ever-growing farm family. Between 5:00pm – 10:00pm on March 20th our black-spotted sow, a heritage cross-breed of Gloucestershire Old Spot and Tamworth, delivered a litter of five healthy and robust piglets. Farm Manager Michele Wales and CSA Farmer Dan O’Brien were on hand to help the laboring mother through her first farrowing.

The piglets will be used for Coverdale Farm education programs as part of the living classroom.  Students will learn about the farm habitat, animal behavior, and the husbandry needs of these highly intelligent creatures.

The piglets will be used for Coverdale Farm education programs as part of the living classroom. Students will learn about the farm habitat, animal behavior, and the husbandry needs of these highly intelligent creatures.

Michele was cool under pressure and knew exactly what to do at all the right times, an experienced pig midwife. Dan took lead as an enthusiastic assistant, learning the ropes and capturing the process in pictures. We made certain to keep the bedding clean as the sow made mounding nests during delivery. Next came the mounting of a heat lamp to warm the tiny piglets as they entered the world. As each piglet was born we kept watchful eyes to ensure the new arrivals were breathing freely, seeking and receiving mother’s milk, and huddling under the heat lamp together. Our eyes were also fixed on the sow. Post-delivery, it is vital to see her move around, drink water, and eat food. Healthy piglets only remain healthy if the mother is strong!

The new piglets are very hungry!

The new piglets are very hungry!

After a few cold, dark hours, all of the piglets had finally arrived and aggressively pursued the mother’s swollen teats and the warmth of her body. Total success! With all of the new baby piglets safely piled upon one another for warmth, Farmers Michele and Dan were able to call it a night knowing that the new happy family would be safe and sound in their warm straw bed. Over the next few days the little piglets have become more active and will continue to grow at the rate of around one pound per day.  Enjoy this short video of the piglets getting their first meal.

Come and visit these piglets along with our other farm babies on May 9! Coverdale Farm will be OPEN for visitation each Saturday beginning May 9 through September 26, 9:00am – 4:00pm.

By Derek Stoner, Seasonal Program Coordinator

A Wood Frog makes its way down to the marsh at Ashland on March 1, 2011.  What day will they emerge this year?

A Wood Frog makes its way down to the marsh at Ashland on March 1, 2011. What day will they emerge this year?

Spring officially begins today–  Friday, March 20th.  The weather outside may still not look like Spring, but the season has been pushing the envelope recently as Winter slowly relinquishes its grip and gives way to the inevitable arrival of true Signs of Spring:  the plants and animals that we count on as true signals of the changing season.

Just in the past week at Ashland Nature Center, keen observers have noted emerging Skunk Cabbage, Groundhogs running about, and Snowdrops in full bloom.   With warmer temperatures and rain in the future forecast, the big movement of amphibians to the wetland habitats will get underway.

To preview photos of Signs of Spring that are on the way, we invite you to view this video.

The twenty plants and animals shown in the video are the unique Signs of Spring selected to be part of our fifth annual Delaware Nature Society Signs of Spring Challenge.  Wherever you are this Spring, keep an eye out for these interesting sights and make a note of when you first observe them outdoors.  See how quickly you can tally up the full twenty!  Will it take you through the month of May or will you find them all by the end of April?  Only time will tell, and you can share this challenge with your fellow naturalists and family members.

To participate, click here:   Signs of Spring Challenge 2015

Download and print this form to keep track of your observations this Spring.  The challenge is free and just for fun– and you are the winner since you’ll be enjoying a more rewarding experience afield this Spring.

Please photograph and document the Signs of Spring that you see and share them with us by email at derek@delnature.org .  We will post a collection of the best photographs and stories from Spring 2015 in a follow-up post at the conclusion of the Spring season.

By Joe Sebastiani, Ashland Nature Center Manager

We were walking through the dense Terra Firme Jungle south of the Napo River in eastern Ecuador.  My group stopped in front of me to photograph a stunning red flower.  I wasn’t paying too much attention to them, but to my surprise, in an instant they all started screaming!  In a flash, some kind of furry animal was headed straight towards me, and it was the size of a small dog.  Not only was my group screaming, but I screamed as well! The animal did not see me, and in its fright flight, skidded and slammed right into my leg.  By the dusky smell it gave off, we knew we had scared a White-lipped Peccary just off the trail.

This is just one of hundreds of memories that come forth when recalling the amazing DNS trip to Ecuador in November of 2014. Joined by our tour leader Forrest Rowland, we toured the country on a birding trip of a lifetime.  You might remember Forrest as the first Hawk Watcher at the Ashland Hawk Watch in 2007.  He spent the next two seasons as the Hawk Watcher at the Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch.  Now, Forrest is the manager for birding tours in the western hemisphere for Rockjumper Tours, and is an Ecuadorian bird expert.

Birding from the canopy tower in a huge Kapok tree at the Sacha Lodge in Amazonian Ecuador.

Birding from the canopy tower in a huge Kapok tree at the Sacha Lodge in Amazonian Ecuador.

On our trip, we ventured up and down the eastern and western slopes of the Andes, and down into the Amazonian lowlands for 19 days.  The focus was birding, and saw a huge selection of species in a wide spectrum of habitat types including temperate, subtropical, and tropical forest as well as high elevation Paramo grasslands up to almost 15,000 feet.  That elevation was not so kind to everyone in the group and resulted in a few people who contracted temporary altitude sickness.

There are more than 1,600 species of birds in Ecuador, and we experienced 771 of them.  This is a mind-numbing variety of bird species to see, and each day we traveled to new habitats where there was a whole new suite of sights, sounds, and of course birds.  This, along with sightings of 25 species of mammals which included 8 monkey species made for a very special trip.

Please enjoy this 5-minute video of our trip highlights.

Top ten bird species (of the 771 that we found) voted on by the group:

1. Crested Owl  2. Torrent Duck 3. Sword-billed Hummingbird 4. Great Potoo 5. Banded Antbird 6. Andean Condor 7.Rufous-bellied Seedsnipe 8. Hoatzin 9. Wire-crested Thorntail (hummingbird) 10. Golden-headed Quetzal.

Primates and other mammals seen by the group:

White-tailed (paramo) Deer, White-lipped Peccary, Tayra, Andean Long-tailed Weasel, Olinguito (described to science in 2013), Lesser Long-nosed Bat, White-lined Sac-winged Bat, Greater Bulldog Bat, Tent-making Bat, Fishing Bat, Nine-banded Armadillo, Forest Rabbit, Lemurine Night Monkey, Spix’s Night Monkey, Red Howler Monkey, Common Wooly Monkey, White-fronted Capuchin Monkey, Common Squirrel Monkey, Dusky Titi Monkey, Napo Tamarin, Capybara, Central American Agouti, Black Agouti, Western Dwarf Squirrel, Red-tailed Squirrel.

If you are interested in traveling with the Delaware Nature Society on future trips, we are offering a trip to Costa Rica, October 25 to November 5.  The $3,349 double-occupancy price is guaranteed through April 24th, so make your reservation with us soon!  Receive $50 off the trip by attending a Costa Rica Preview presentation at Ashland Nature Center on April 13, 6pm.  Light fare will be served as you learn more about this trip.  Call (302) 239-2334 ext. 134 to register for the preview night or inquire about the Costa Rica trip.

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Birding the high elevation grassland habitat called Paramo.