First Wood Frog Eggs of Spring at Ashland

By Derek Stoner, Conservation Project Coordinator

The first Wood Frog egg masses of the season, observed in the Ashland Marsh on March 12.  Notice the tiny black dots, each of which is an individual Wood Frog egg.   Image by Derek Stoner.
The first Wood Frog egg masses of the season, observed in the Ashland Marsh on March 12. Notice the tiny black dots, each of which is an individual Wood Frog egg. Image by Derek Stoner.

The rains and warmer weather this week brought out the amphibians at Ashland, with Wood Frogs headlining the show.  On Tuesday there were dozens of male Wood Frogs lining the edges of the Ashland Marsh during the rain, uttering their distinctive “chuck-chuck” call.

By the end of the day, the quiet female Wood Frogs had laid the first egg masses of the season, and I counted at least 11 masses in one cluster.  Each female Wood Frog lays one ball-like cluster of eggs, which may contain up to four hundred individual eggs.  So the image above shows the potential for more than 4,400 tiny tadpoles to be produced!

Jim White, DNS Associate Director for Land and Biodiversity, and author of Amphibians and Reptiles of Delmarva, will be following up this post with a great blog about the Wood Frog mating activity.  For now, we encourage you all to get to the Ashland Marsh in the next few days to witness this spectacle of Wood Frogs– they don’t stick around too long!

In other Signs of Spring news, the first Tree Swallows of Spring were observed flying above the Ashland Lodge on Wednesday, March 13.

1 thought on “First Wood Frog Eggs of Spring at Ashland”

  1. Cool! I’ve seen these masses before and never stopped to wonder what they were. Frog eggs, of course!

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