Snow Birds

By Joe Sebastiani, Members Program Team Leader

During all of this snow we are getting, it is a good time to keep the bird feeder stocked and to actually watch what is going on.  Birds are more tame at the feeder during bad weather, and it makes for an excellent photography session.  Enjoy the photo collage of birds I photographed at my feeding station recently.

Northern Cardinals zip in and out of the feeding station throughout the day during bad weather.
Northern Cardinals zip in and out of the feeding station throughout the day during bad weather.
Carolina Chickadees are our local chickadee species.  Black-capped Chickadees visit Delaware in some winters, but this winter, I have only seen one of them.
Carolina Chickadees are our local chickadee species. Black-capped Chickadees visit Delaware in some winters, but this winter I have only seen one of them.
Carolina Wrens will visit the feeder as well, especially if you put out a suet cake.  However, they will also eat some seeds.  This species has historically had population crashes during severe winters with deep snow.  We will see what Carolina Wren populations look like in our area after this winter.
Carolina Wrens will visit the feeder as well, especially if you put out a suet cake. However, they will also eat some seeds. This species has historically had population crashes during severe winters with deep snow. We will see what Carolina Wren populations look like in our area after this winter.
You can actually see the red belly of this Red-bellied Woodpecker!
You can actually see the red belly of this Red-bellied Woodpecker!
This Fox Sparrow had not visited our feeder all winter until the big snowstorm last weekend.  We also had an Eastern Towhee and a Field Sparrow that made a first-time appearance after the snow.  Birds will find your feeder from the surrounding countryside when weather conditions make it tough to find natural food.
This Fox Sparrow had not visited our feeder all winter until the big snowstorm last weekend. We also had an Eastern Towhee and a Field Sparrow that made a first-time appearance after the snow. Birds will find your feeder from the surrounding countryside when weather conditions make it tough to find natural food.
After the snow stops falling, look in your yard for prints they have made.
After the snow stops falling, look in your yard for prints birds and other animals left behind.

Participate in the upcoming Great Backyard Bird Count this Friday through Monday, February 12-15.  Bird in your yard or a nearby park and report your sightings at the above link.  

Join us Friday, February 12th for the Breakfast and the Great Backyard Bird Count program at Ashland Nature Center.  Enjoy a diner-style breakfast, then go out to look for birds with us.  At the end, we will report sightings for the count.  It is $15 for DNS members and $22 for non-members.  Sign up at the link above or call (302) 239-2334 ext. 115 to let us know you are coming by Thursday afternoon.

5 thoughts on “Snow Birds”

  1. I saw a carolina wren at my suet feeder this morning and yesterday. I have them every year. They are great to watch. The dark eyed juncos are also a favorite of mine. I’ve noticed less cardinals in my yard this year. Have you noticed this as well?

  2. Joanne: I am seeing quite a few cardinals as of this week. They really came out of the woods to feed at the feeding station here.

  3. so many birds at the feeders this past week…i counted over a dozen cardinals on the back hill late this afternoon…more than last year…i’m in wilm on the b. river

  4. Joanne,
    The cardinals are all out at my house! counted five of them near/under our biggest feeder yesterday.

    I agree with Joe about how “tame” these birds get in bad weather. I went out to top off my feeders this afternoon, with the snow still falling. The juncos, chicadees, titmice and sparrows all just jumped into the nearest bush (just six feet away) and watched as I filled the feeders. As soon as I stepped away, they were back at it! We had a fairly big hawk (cooper’s? sharp-shinned?) standing over one of the feeders today, waiting for breakfast to fly in. He flew off while I went to get my camera 🙁

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